fbpx
Print this page
Tuesday, 14 February 2012 09:31

Fonterra recalls butter

Written by 

Fonterra is recalling two batches of butter after the discovery of a fine metal object in the product.

Fonterra Brands (New Zealand) Ltd (FBNZ) is conducting a voluntary recall of:

Mainland Salted Butter 500gm-, best before date of January 10, 2013 (Batch CV12) and

Anchor Salted Butter 500gm-, best before date January 26, 2013 (Batch CV28)

FBNZ managing director Peter McClure says the recall follows two isolated complaints received from consumers who had found a fine metal object in their butter products. There have been no reports of anyone being injured.

"The voluntary recall is a precautionary measure as there can be no compromise when it comes to product quality or the health and safety of our consumers," says McClure.

"We advise anyone with family or friends who may have bought this product to contact them in case they do not see or hear this announcement."

Consumers should not consume the above-stated products but should return them to the point of purchase, with the appropriate packaging (batch code included), for a full refund.

This recall is limited to the above-stated products that are produced and sold in New Zealand and no other FBNZ products are affected.

Food recall notices have been placed in daily newspapers across New Zealand this week and authorities have been notified.

For further information, consumers should call the FBNZ Customer and Consumer Services line: 0800 262 467.

More like this

Carbon zero milk

Fonterra has joined forces with a supermarket chain to deliver what it claims is NZ’s first carbon zero milk.

Featured

Lindsay Farm raw milk recall

Raw milk from Central Hawke’s Bay producers Lindsay Farm is being recalled after Campylobacterbacteria was found in some product.

 

Carcase collection impasse

Collection of dead calves from farms around the country has stopped with farmers and the recycling company blaming each other for the impasse.

Taking NAIT seriously

North Otago calf rearer Jared Ovens believes the Mycoplasma bovis outbreak has led to more farmers embracing animal traceability.