Print this page
Tuesday, 03 May 2016 14:07

Rural health issues brought to the Beehive

Written by 

Rural health issues will be brought to the Beehive this week.

Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHANZ) is gathering in Wellington for the inaugural RuralFest conference tomorrow (May4) and Thursday.

RHANZ, which is made up of 42 membership organisations, will discuss and determine the top health and well-being issues facing rural communities.

Rural GP Dr Jo Scott-Jones says RuralFest is a flagship event for RHANZ, who represent a united voice from across multiple rural sector organisations.

"We're aiming to identify the key 'common ground' issues that all member organisations think are important for the health and well-being of rural New Zealand," he says.

"This is important because the health of people living and working in rural New Zealand is a vital part of our economy and essential if we are going to double the value of exports by 2025.

"We will aim to provide solutions rather than just identify problems and are grateful for the opportunity to take these key messages into the offices of parliamentarians.

"At RuralFest, we will determine around five priorities for the health and well-being of those in rural communities - and then take those issues to parliament to discuss with key politicians."

Dr Scott-Jones says rural residents have notoriously suffered from inequality in healthcare - usually because rural communities often have poor access to resources and key health professionals.

"We're here to promote the highest quality and efficient health and disability service for all rural people and their families," he said.

More like this

Getting the balance right!

OPINION: Many sunsets ago, I learnt from one of the older father figures in my life the ageless truth that, “Balance is the key to life”. 

Safety mindset must change

WorkSafe NZ is calling on farmers and other rural businesses to treat health and safety as more than a compliance issue.

Featured

 

‘Cows can help reverse global warming’

Cows and pasture are not the villains in climate change, but could instead be our saviours, says Hawke’s Bay farmer, soil scientist and consultant Phyllis Tichinin.

Pork industry scholarships available

Massey University students looking to fund their studies in the pork industry have until March 10 to apply for up to four New Zealand Pork Industry Board scholarships.