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Friday, 24 September 2021 15:02

Waikato farmer fined $9,000 and restricted from owning cows

Written by  Staff Reporters
A Waikato farmer has been fined $9,000 and faces restrictions on the number of cows he can own after he plead guilty to charges related to underfeeding 228 cows and 60 one-year-old heifers. A Waikato farmer has been fined $9,000 and faces restrictions on the number of cows he can own after he plead guilty to charges related to underfeeding 228 cows and 60 one-year-old heifers.

A farmer who underfed nearly 300 cows and heifers has been fined $9,000, ordered to pay vet costs of $1,763 and faces permanent restrictions on the number of animals he can own.

Nigel George Rowan (74) pleaded guilty to three charges under the Animal Welfare Act at the Hamilton District Court yesterday. The charges related to underfeeding 178 milking cows, 50 dry cows and a mob of 60 rising one-year-old heifers.

In addition to the fine and costs, Rowan has been disqualified from having more than 250 cattle over the age of 6 months and 60 calves under the age of 6 months on the farm.

The court heard that the situation could have been managed, but Rowan allowed conditions on his farm to deteriorate. Between 2018 and 2020, he received advice and a plan to improve the body condition of his animals from a number of parties, including his industry bodies and a farm consultant.

MPI’s animal welfare and NAIT compliance regional manager Brendon Mikkelsen says people in charge of animals have responsibility for their welfare.

“Mr Rowan failed his animals by not taking opportunities to address the issues.”

He says Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) animal welfare inspectors, backed by a veterinarian, inspected all 288 cattle at the property and found the farm low on pasture.

“Supplementary feed was available but it wasn’t being fed out at a level that would improve the situation for his animals.

“The body weight of many of the milking mob was too low for milking and some of these animals had become emaciated, while others showed signs of stunted growth.”

Mikkelsen says that while most farmers take their responsibility to their animals very seriously, MPI’s advice to farmers who detect issues is to take action early and reach out for help if needed.

“We strongly encourage any member of the public who is aware of animal ill-treatment or cruelty to report it to the MPI animal welfare complaints freephone 0800 00 83 33.”

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