Wednesday, 25 November 2020 09:20

Investment in genomic science to farmers benefit, says LIC

Written by Staff Reporters
Rate this item
(0 votes)
LIC says their decision to invest in genomic science has been of benefit to farmers. LIC says their decision to invest in genomic science has been of benefit to farmers.

Livestock Improvement Corporation (LIC) says their investment in genomic science has increased returns for dairy farmers.

 

The company have invested more than $78 million in genomic science and genome sequencing technology over the last ten years.

LIC general manager NZ markets Malcolm Ellis said that when it comes to breeding, LIC’s investment in the long game has big benefits to farmers.

“Farmers appreciate the time lag of genetic gain between putting quality genetics into their herd and seeing the resulting benefits. But through sustained farmer shareholder investment and a wealth of genomics data we are delivering an increased rate of genetic gain within the bulls that arrive on farm each year,” Ellis said. 

He said that, coupled with good cows and a good herd, genomic science presents “a real opportunity” to shore up the herd’s efficiency. 

Ellis said that the company will continue to invest in research and development on behalf of its farmer shareholders. 

“As we invest more into the space, it is pleasing to see more and more farmers utilising genomic sires,” he said. 

LIC expects to complete 1.4 million genomic inseminations throughout New Zealand by the end of 2020.

Read 1056 times

The Hound

Murky waters

OPINION: Your canine crusader knows there is a great deal of unease - especially in rural NZ - about the…

Who?

OPINION: The refusal of both Damien O'Connor and PM Jacinda Ardern to release some of the correspondence they received about…

» Connect with Rural News

Popular Reads

We are fighting - Morrison

Beef+Lamb NZ is committed to arguing for a fair and appropriate framework for tackling climate change, claims chairman Andrew Morrison.

Vaccinations at meat plants

The penny seems to have dropped that the workforce which produces food for local and export markets are very much…