Thursday, 19 November 2020 12:25

Exploring benefits of pasture-raised beef and lamb

Written by  Staff Reporters
A team of researchers will look at the benefits of pasture-raised beef and lamb. A team of researchers will look at the benefits of pasture-raised beef and lamb.

New Zealanders will be invited to take part in a major research programme to assess the health and wellbeing benefits of eating pasture-raised beef and lamb, compared to alternatives.

 

Approximately 100 people will be monitored in two ground-breaking clinical studies, led by researchers from AgResearch, the Riddet Institute and the University of Auckland.

The projects will assess the physical effects on the body from eating the different foods for up to 10 weeks, as well as psychological elements, such as satisfaction, sleep and stress levels.

The research team includes meat scientists, agricultural academics, dietitians, behavioural experts and social scientists.

Sirma Karapeeva, chief executive of Meat Industry Association, is excited by the programme of research being undertaken.

She said much of the global research on the health, nutritional and environmental aspects of red meat was based on intensive grain-finished farming systems.

“However, New Zealand specialises in free-range livestock farming that is naturally pasture-raised, antibiotic-free and hormone-free,” Karapeeva said.

“We know there are myths and misinformation about the production and benefits of eating red meat, so we have turned to research to help bring balance to what consumers are hearing.

She said that consumers are making decisions around their diets based on ideologies.

“In part, this is a backlash against broken food systems, such as factory farming and ‘big food’. There is a growing consumer desire for better quality food produced from natural systems, which supports a strong future for ‘real’ red meat as produced in New Zealand,” Karapeeva said.

Meat Industry Association chief executive, Sirma Karapeeva says she is excited by the research.

Results from the two studies will provide baseline data about pasture-raised beef and lamb and its consumption in comparison to other foods.

A sustained clinical study will see members of 40 households on a managed flexitarian dietary regime over 10 weeks.

Participants will be monitored over the course of the study and changes in health status, behaviours and attitudes and perceptual well-being recorded.

The research is supported by Meat Industry Association Innovation (MIA Innovation) and jointly funded with Beef + Lamb New Zealand Ltd, the High-Value Nutrition National Science Challenge, and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE).

More like this

US holds up NZ meat exports

New Zealand's red meat sector exports to the United States grew by 50% during the three months from July to September this year compared to a year earlier.

Not all GHGs are the same

The New Zealand Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (NZRSB) is calling for a new, more accurate, method for calculating methane emissions.

NZ beef on show in Beijing

New Zealand's grass-fed beef drew large crowds at 13 of Beijing’s ultra-high-end retail stores – 7 Fresh.

Featured

 

New investment in spirulina production

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) Sustainable Food & Fibres Futures Fund will invest in a project to assess the viability of larger scale production of spirulina in New Zealand.

National

Machinery & Products

Weeds in for a shock

WIith an increasing focus on reducing chemical herbicides, largely because of crop resistance and a potential build-up of residues, new…

V8 - a baler with a grunt

Following three years of testing with clients worldwide, Ireland-based manufacturer McHale has added a bigger model to its range of…

Virtual CV valuable tool

With a 12-year history of recruiting specialised operators from overseas to service the agricultural contracting industry, Hanzon Jobs typically brings…

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Tough gig!

OPINION: This old mutt has a fair amount of sympathy for Ag Minister Damien O’Connor with the two associate ministers…

Cow killer

OPINION: The Hound was not surprised to hear well-known end-of-the-world doom-merchant ‘Dr’ Mike Joy is still as joyless as ever…

» Connect with Rural News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter