Thursday, 09 June 2016 07:55

Have tracks, will travel

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Track systems see typical slip values of 3-5%, compared with 12-15% for wheeled tractors in good conditions. Track systems see typical slip values of 3-5%, compared with 12-15% for wheeled tractors in good conditions.

Track systems have many advantages over conventional wheel and tyre systems, not least more grip and reduced ground compaction.

While normally the domain of high power prime movers, the recent appointment of Cervus Equipment as the New Zealand distributors for the Soucy Track systems will bring the technology to a wider audience – with kits available for all the major brands in the marketplace.

Soucy Tracks are said to offer three times more surface contact than a typical tyre set-up, by way of a much larger footprint, while causing around half the compaction of a dual wheel arrangement and resulting in greater yield potentials.

While it is claimed that track systems allow users to travel over paddocks in less-than-ideal conditions of softer footprint and greater tractor, it's probably better to look at the benefits from a different perspective.

Wheeled tractors normally operate at 12-15% wheel slip in optimum conditions, but this can exceed 30% in difficult going, with the higher values causing major damage to soil structure.

Track systems see typical slip values of 3-5%, which over a given area and operating at the same power will see a reduction in operating hours of around 10%.

This fact alone will result in major savings in fuel, and preserve soil structure.

At Fieldays, Cervus Equipment will display a four track system fitted to a JD 6125R tractor, which is claimed to offer key benefits over a two track system – smoother ride quality and full power turns, while retaining the original transmission ratios of the tractor and so eliminating any additional loads on the driveline.

Supplied as a complete kit, the system also offers the benefit of being able to be removed from a tractor at the time of changeover, returning that unit back to the standard layout, and then being re-installed on a new unit.

"We are pleased to be introducing this cutting-edge technology to a market always keen to look at new ideas" Cervus sales manager Tim Harty says.

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