Friday, 12 April 2019 11:29

‘Kiwi spec’ tractor for small paddocks

Written by  Mark Daniel
The T4-S. The T4-S.

Norwood, distributors of New Holland in New Zealand, has launched a new tractor series — T4-S — designed for livestock and smaller mixed farms.

The series has three models of 55, 65 and 75hp.

Norwood says its recognises that many smaller farms prefer mechanical simplicity, good specifications as standard, and above all versatility.

This ‘Kiwi spec’ model mates a 2.9L 3-cylinder S8000 Tier III engine with high power and torque to a 12x12 transmission, enhanced with a hydraulic shuttle operated by a steering column mounted paddle. This makes the T4-S particularly suitable for loader work, while an optional creep set can offer speeds from 100m/h for, say, vegetable planting.

 A new four-post cabin is said to offer roominess and visibility, and the opening roof panel gives an extra sightline to a frontloader. The flat cab floor provides easy access and plenty of space, while a powerful heating and air conditioning package increases operator comfort and helps reduce fatigue. 

Rear lift capacity is rated at 3000kg with two external assist rams, up to three hydraulic remotes are available and the standard flow rate is up to 48L/min. 

All models have a two-speed 540/540E PTO engaged by a servo assisted lever, while a soft-start function modulates engagement to protect the tractor and implements.

The wheelbase is compact at 2130mm, overall height is 2520mm, and operating widths, dependent on tyre widths and track settings, are 1440 - 1950mm, all making the T4-S a versatile small tractor. 

It has a FL 3.15 Master, factory-fitted loader made in Turkey. This uses an integrated joystick, has a lift height of 3.0m and capacity of 1720kg. It comes as standard with a 1.8m re-handling bucket. 

www.newholland.co.nz 

 

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