Thursday, 16 June 2016 06:55

Waves bye, bye to birds

Written by 
Alpine Buildings' Hot-Box Rafter. Alpine Buildings' Hot-Box Rafter.

Alpine Buildings, Timaru, claims to be New Zealand's first company to make complete kitset buildings and is well known for developing a bird-proof rafter called Zero-Bird-Perch.

Its latest advance, which is being launched at National Fieldays, is the Hot-Box Rafter, said to be NZ's first completely hot dip-galvanised, bird-proof rafter; it is expected to last at least 2.5 times longer than anything else available.

Molten zinc, in which the steel is immersed, coats the surfaces inside and out, unlike sprayed zinc 'galv' which largely only protects outer surfaces.

Preventing birds perching, with their resultant mess, will keep buildings looking smarter for much longer.

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