Friday, 01 May 2020 12:27

A plan for more forestry workers

Written by  Staff Reporters
Shane Jones. Shane Jones.

The Government is teaming up with the forestry and wood-processing sector to attract an additional 5000 workers to the sector.

The move will help the industries grow for a “post-COVID-19 world”, says forestry minister Shane Jones.

The inaugural meeting of the Forestry and Wood Processing Workforce Council is being held today. The council will implement the Workforce Action Plan, that was presented to Jones in January, and identify what should take priority as New Zealand emerges from COVID-19 lockdown.

“The forestry and wood-processing sector is at the heart of many regions and the communities within them. With a workforce of more than 38,500 and contributing more than $6.9 billion in export revenue, it will play a critical role in New Zealand’s economic recovery,” says Jones.

 “The world wants our timber and wood products and the industry needs more workers. There is a huge opportunity for people to retrain and take up work in the industry.”

It is estimated the forestry and wood-processing sector will need another 5000 workers by 2025.  

The action plan addresses common forestry and wood processing workforce challenges by complementing and building on existing initiatives, as well as beginning new ones. 

“COVID-19 has been unprecedented global event, but one thing remains the same, New Zealand has some of the best timber and wood products in the world, we need a skilled workforce to keep this sector moving forward, and the world wants our high quality products. We need to seize that opportunity,” says Jones.

 The Forestry and Wood Processing Workforce Action Plan 2020-2024

and a high level summary can be found on the MPI website here.

More like this

Wine tour woes

Bookings for premium wine tours “vanished” when New Zealand’s borders closed, say operators struggling under Covid-19.

Vintage update

Wine companies, large and small, are grappling with the potential shortage of a reliable labour force for vintage 2021, with borders closed to international workers.

Covid-19 a big hit to small wineries

Losing boutique wineries to Covid-19 would be a blow for New Zealand’s wine industry, say the authors of a new report into challenges for small operators.

Digital juice

Covid-19, e-commerce and the risk of digital debt.

Open doors

As wineries enter the spring season, many opening cellar doors after a period of Covid-19 closure, the mood appears one of cautious optimism.

Featured

Meat quota rates remain vital

A jump in the value and volume of New Zealand’s sheepmeat exports to Europe and the UK shows why preserving WTO tariff-rate quotas is so important, claims the Meat Industry Association (MIA).

 

Lamb price down, but not weak

While lamb prices are starting the new season at around 16% below last year’s levels, they are not outright weak, according to the BNZ.

National

It’s all kosher – Taggart

Farmer-owned cooperative Alliance Group says it has already returned $17 million of the $34.3 million it claimed from the Covid-19…

Machinery & Products

JCB releases new loader range

Originally scheduled for a June Fieldays release, which was stymied by the Covid crisis, JCB has recently unveiled its third…

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

He's back!

OPINION: This old mutt understands that former Fonterra chief executive Theo Spierings has landed himself a new gig back in his…

Utu?

OPINION: Your canine crusader understands that the farmer’s favourite politician – Environment Minister David Parker – not content with implementing…

» Connect with Rural News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter