Thursday, 04 August 2016 14:40

Maori bringing capital, talent to horticulture

Written by 
Plant and Food chief executive officer Peter Landon-Lane. Plant and Food chief executive officer Peter Landon-Lane.

Horticulture can expect to see more talent and capital in the industry with Maori, says Plant and Food chief executive officer Peter Landon-Lane.

There are many Maori businesses and people involved in horticulture, he told the Horticulture NZ conference in Nelson today.

As they were in the Te Tau Ihu region he acknowledged the Wakatu Corporation, owners of the Kono brand and wine, horticulture and seafood producers.

Across New Zealand, Maori now own 10% of the kiwifruit sector, he said. Many iwi and Maori organisations are looking at opportunities across a wide spectrum of horticultural crops and food products.

This new interest and investment from Maori promises big things for horticulture – great potential in land and capital but also new opportunities in branding, potentially new crops and a pool of young people who will help meet the need for talent.

A third of Maori are under the age of 15, so there's a talent pool, he said.

More like this

Hort export figures challenged

Horticulture's export revenue growth is likely to be about 10% in the current financial year – not the 3.8% forecast by the Ministry for Primary Industries.

More RSE workers still needed

HortNZ says the Government is moving in the right direction with its increase in recognised seasonal employers (RSE) workers.

A big future ahead

Age hasn't been a barrier for young vegetable grower of the year Austin Singh Purewal.

Protect productive land — HortNZ

Moves by the Government to protect highly productive land must focus on maintaining the productive capacity of that land, says HortNZ.

Featured

 

Celebrating healthy food

Mark Ross, chief executive of Agcarm on the work that goes into providing safe and healthy food to New Zealanders. 

No more coal-fired boilers

Canterbury-based Synlait Milk has reaffirmed its policy of building no more coal-fired boilers, with the official opening of the country’s first large-scale electrode boiler at its Dunsandel headquarters.

A slice of farming paradise in Auckland City

Livestock grazing on a farm with a good view of Auckland’s Sky Tower is the story behind the latest Dairy Women’s Network visual story telling project Our People, Their Stories.

Synlait unveils tree-planting scheme

Synlait Milk is establishing an industrial-scale native plant nursery at its Dunsandel headquarters as the centrepiece of a wide-ranging environmental initiative.

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Appropriate

Your canine crusader reckons it is ironic – and highly appropriate – that Shane Jones’ $3 billion electoral slush fund…

Funny names

Over the years, a mate of the Hound’s has always been quick to point out to him people in roles…

» Connect with Rural News