Wednesday, 04 May 2022 13:55

State help for coal project

Written by  Staff Reporters
Ravensdown chief executive Garry Diack. Ravensdown chief executive Garry Diack.

Ravensdown is getting government co-funding to install a biomass combustor at its Dipton lime quarry.

Locally supplied wood fuel will replace coal in the lime-drying process - an important part of preparing the naturally occurring soil conditioner for use by Southland farmers and growers.

The co-operative's commitment is being matched by funding through the Government Investment in Decarbonising Industry (GIDI) Fund. The funding agreement with EECA (Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority) commits Ravensdown to savings of at least 1,107 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions per annum, reducing Ravensdown's direct carbon footprint by almost 10%.

According to EECA, process heat accounts for over a quarter of New Zealand's energy-related emissions, presenting a huge opportunity for businesses to take a lead in climate change mitigation.

The GIDI Fund is part of the government's Covid Response and Recovery Fund, established to drive economic stimulus and job creation through decarbonisation projects.

The project contributes to Ravensdown's commitment to eliminate coal use by 2030 and is the outcome of comprehensive study to ensure that the most appropriate renewable fuel has been selected for this particular site and activity.

Ravensdown chief executive Garry Diack thanked the Government for its support.

"The intense interest in GIDI from all parts of the manufacturing economy shows how important the fund has been in driving the climate change response. Ravensdown is thrilled to receive this support in order to greatly advance progress on our plan to phase out coal across the business."

National quarries manager Richard Millar explained that the conversion will have secondary benefits for the local area.

"Heat from burning coal is currently used to dry lime on site before it is distributed to customers' farms. We're particularly excited to have Niagara Wood Fuels on board as a local supplier for the biomass. By sourcing the fuel from the surrounding area, the idea is to contribute to the local economy and reinvest in community development.

"The heat source is an essential part of our production, and it has to work reliably in all conditions. Knowing that we can continue to meet farmers needs while removing our biggest source of emissions at the quarry is a major step forward."

Ravensdown lime is used on farm to improve fertility by reducing acidity. Along with reducing transport emissions, drying the lime helps it to be spread more evenly as a powder over grazing areas.

More like this

Workshops to offer solutions

SIDE 2022 will offer a wide range of workshops which provide practical solutions to farming challenges and help farmers taking advantage of a rapidly changing farming environment.

New chair for fertiliser co-op

Former Federated Farmers national president Bruce Wills has been elected as the new chair of fertiliser co-operative Ravensdown.

Freight disruption looms!

One of the country's big fertiliser co-operatives is warning of looming disruptions to the transport sector.

Zero methane emissions from effluent ponds

Ravensdown and Lincoln University scientists have developed an effluent treatment system that can mitigate virtually all methane emissions from effluent ponds, cutting a dairy farm's overall methane emissions by 4 to 5%.

National

Battle of wearables

It was the battle of the wearables at the recent Lincoln University Demonstration Dairy Farm Focus Day with presentations of…

Who dares wins

In a move that reminded everyone of the SAS motto, 'Who dares wins', Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, Agriculture Minister Damien…

Machinery & Products

India boosts fert subsidy

India plans to double its budgeted 2021-22 fertiliser subsidies to a record of more than 1.55 trillion rupees (US$20.64 billion)…

Kicking lameness into touch

Lameness in dairy cows can have a significant effect on a businesses' bottom line, with vets suggesting that each case…

Single row concept delivers results

While Controlled Traffic Farming (CTF) has become increasingly popular over the last decade, German company Amazone is looking to take…

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

Milking It

Fake and cheap

OPINION: First they demanded plant-based 'milk', now they want it priced cheaper than real milk.

Cannon fodder?

OPINION: The recent high-profile Mycoplasma bovis announcement from the Government in Hamilton featured Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Agriculture Minister…

» Connect with Dairy News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter