Tuesday, 23 July 2013 15:48

Closed loop recycling for Anchor bottles

Written by 

Anchor's new light proof milk bottles can now be fully recycled in New Zealand.


Fonterra Brands says the bottles, made of the same HDPE plastic as the previous bottles, are now part of a fully closed loop recycling system within New Zealand. This means that capacity exists amongst recyclers to use 100% of recycled Anchor bottles in the manufacture of new products right here in New Zealand.


Anchor group marketing manager, Craig Irwin says despite some consumer confusion, the light proofs bottle has always been recyclable.


"It is made of the same high grade HDPE plastic and has already been recycled into a range of products. What we're proud to announce today is that we have closed the loop by lining up recycling separators with recycled product manufacturers.


"We have worked with the recycling community to ensure the recycling separators are aware of the opportunities to receive high returns for the new bottles by selling to domestic recycling manufacturers, who say they have more than 100% capacity to use all Anchor bottles, rather than shipping overseas," Irwin says.


Recyclers who have put their hand up to use recycled Anchor bottles in the manufacture of a wide range of products include Astron, Rural Direct, Comspec and Replas. Recycled Anchor bottles have already been used in the production of recycling bins, slip sheets, cable covers, culverts, agricultural pipes and drainage coils.


The latest addition to this suite of products is a new Hungry Bin food composting system, which contains 25% recycled Anchor milk bottle material. Four prototype Hungry Bins have just been installed in Auckland marketplace, Ponsonby Central, who will install an entire bank of the bins once they roll off the production lines in August. In October, 50 Hungry Bins will be awarded as prizes to schools who participate in Keep New Zealand Beautiful week.


Environmental Manager at Anchor, Nic Bishop, adds that Kiwis can recycle the new bottles exactly how they always have.


"Kerbside collectors and transfer stations or community recycling stations throughout New Zealand will accept Anchor bottles. The bottles are in demand from New Zealand recycled product manufacturers, who have indicated they will pay around $400 per tonne. We encourage recyclers to take up this offer."


Steve Mead, business manager for Astron, says "We have already recycled Anchor coloured HDPE plastic into a wide range of products, and will be able to reuse the bottles for things like packaging, construction materials, handling products, and pipe. From a processing perspective there is no difference to clear HDPE plastic and using plastic recycled from the Anchor bottle is a more sustainable alternative to using new plastic."
Anchor will host the first of a four-monthly forum in October for recycling collectors, separators, product manufacturers and materials experts. The forum's aim is to foster collaboration and identify opportunities for increased use of recycled content in products manufactured here in New Zealand.

 

More like this

Report outlines challenges

Fonterra says it didn’t shy away from its sustainability commitments despite a financially draining 2019.

» The RNG Weather Report

Featured

 

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

Milking It

Nats cop it too

Interestingly, none of the politicians managed to escape the wrath of farmers at the protest march organised by the lobby…

Why the stripes?

An experiment on a herd of cows in central Japan appears to have proven a radical, nature-inspired solution to a…

» Connect with Dairy News