Thursday, 22 October 2020 09:30

Van der Poel, Glass re-elected by farmers

Written by  Sudesh Kissun
Colin Glass (left) and Jim van der Poel. Colin Glass (left) and Jim van der Poel.

Dairy farmers have returned Jim van der Poel and Colin Glass as DairyNZ directors for another three-year term.

Van der Poel, who chairs the industry-good organisation and Glass, chief executive of Dairy Holdings Ltd, saw off a challenge from young Ashburton farmer Cole Groves in this year’s director elections.

The result was announced at DairyNZ’s annual meeting in Ashburton last night.

Van der Poel thanked farmers for their continued support.

With his Sue, van der Poel has farming interests in Waikato, Southland, Canterbury and in the US.  

He has served on the boards of Fonterra, Fonterra Shareholders Fund and New Zealand Cooperative Dairies. He has also received numerous industry awards including Sharemilker of the Year, Dairy Exporter Primary Performer Award and a Nuffield Scholarship.

Glass and his wife Paula, with their two teenage daughters, own a 670-cow dairy farm, and two further irrigated properties rearing and finishing bull beef at Methven, Mid-Canterbury.

Colin heads Dairy Holdings Limited which has extensive operations throughout the South Island. He is a director of several agri-business companies and is currently chairman of Ashburton Lyndhurst Irrigation Limited.

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