Friday, 15 July 2022 07:55

Implement changeovers without any hassle

Written by  Mark Daniel
Kramer’s new ‘Smart Attach’ system avoids the need for the operator to leave the cab. Kramer’s new ‘Smart Attach’ system avoids the need for the operator to leave the cab.

One of the greatest ‘pains’ when changing loader attachments, apart from having to climb down from the cab, is having to change hydraulic hoses that either can’t be undone or can’t be reattached because of residual hydraulic back pressure.

Whatever the problem, it’s usually something that tries an operator’s patience.

Specialised handler manufacturer Kramer, looks to have addressed the issue with its new ‘Smart Attach’ system that avoids the need for the operator to leave the cab. It uses a clever design detail – a hollow locking pin that is hydraulically inserted into the receptor coupling.

This means that auxiliary oil-flows, usually directed via traditional couplings, is now directed through the locking pins, doing away with the need for auxiliary hose couplings altogether.

While this is might appear to be a simple solution, attempts to do the same in the past have led to some problems; typically the high pressures needed for attachments has resulted in blown seals at the locking mechanism.

Kramer has overcome this issue with the help of electronics, which sense when the system has been engaged via a dashboard switch and automatically drops the system pressure from the standard operating pressure of 220 bar to only 25 bar.

This lower value is enough to activate the pins and locate them in the female sockets in the frame of the bucket or implement, before returning to the standard operating pressure when the system is deactivated.

To account for any wear in the hitch points, the locator pins have some ‘float’ built in, allowing them to locate securely, even if the frames on the bucket and on the loader fail to line up exactly.

The company claims that oil-flow remains unrestricted, with switching attachments done in seconds, rather than the minutes required when climbing out of the cab, twice, in a typical changeover. That alone should sell it to many.

While it is impractical to retrofit the system to existing machines, on the plus side, many existing buckets and attachments can be adapted to the system, and it is entirely compatible with all the Kramer-equipped quick hitch attachments that have been produced since 1963.

Only available on the 8 Series loaders at present, there are plans to extend the system across the complete range in due course.

More like this

A baler like no other

While baler-wrapper combinations have become the backbone of baled silage production, one machine stands out from the rest in the layout of the machine.

Small bales in demand

While round or large square bales have the dominant shares in the rural landscape, small square bales still play an important part, especially in the equine sector, but also where the large packages are not easily managed.

New disc cultivator launched

Väderstad has introduced a new disc cultivator – the Carrier XT 425-625 – featuring rotating disc axles, that optimizes results over a range of working depths with easy machine setting.

National

Genetics focus boosts herd

A strong focus on genetics and DNA has paid dividends for Fernside dairy farmer Julie Bradshaw with four of her…

Machinery & Products

A baler like no other

While baler-wrapper combinations have become the backbone of baled silage production, one machine stands out from the rest in the…

Small bales in demand

While round or large square bales have the dominant shares in the rural landscape, small square bales still play an…

Amazone's one-pass operation

Ag machinery maker Amazone has paired up its Precea precision air seeder and Combi-Disc 3000 compact disc harrow to deliver…

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

Milking It

$1m remains unpaid

OPINION: A group of New Zealand farmers who collectively sold $1 million worth of cattle to a live export company…

Too close for comfort

OPINION: One vet believes the threat of foot-and-mouth entering New Zealand is much higher than what authorities tell the public.

» Connect with Dairy News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter