Thursday, 24 October 2019 09:56

Farm level emissions priced by 2025

Written by  Staff Reporters

The Government and farming leaders are joining forces to measure and price emissions at farm level by 2025.

By that date, the partnership aims to see 100% of New Zealand's emissions on the path downwards. But first, emission measurement and pricing methods will have to be developed that are both practical and cost-effective.

In 2022, Cabinet has agreed that the independent Climate Change Commission will check in on the progress made and if commitments aren't being met, the Government can bring the sector into the ETS at processor level before 2025.

The 5-year joint action plan includes:

• Improved tools for estimating and benchmarking emissions on farms

• Integrated farm plans that include a climate module

• Investment in research, development and commercialisation

• Increased farm advisory capacity and capability

• Incentives for early adopters

• Recognition of on-farm mitigation such as small plantings, riparian areas and natural cover

The Government says partnering with Māori will be critical to the success of this joint action plan.

"I'm proud that we have a world-first agreement as part of our plan to tackle the long-term challenge of climate change and we've done that by reaching an historic consensus with our primary sector," Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said.

"For too long politicians have passed the buck and caused uncertainty for everyone while the need for climate action was clear.

"This plan provides the primary sector with certainty and puts us shoulder-to-shoulder on a path to reduce emissions, with ongoing support to help with the plan such as the $229 million Sustainable Land Use investment.

"This will reduce emissions by giving farmers the autonomy to plan to do so and reward those who do," she said.

Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters says the decision to enact the sector-led plan shows that the Government has listened to farmers. 

 Major reforms to the ETS have also been announced to make it fit for purpose, with a cap on industrial energy and transport emissions, and forester incentives simplified.

Minister of Agriculture Damien O'Connor says farmers understand the changing climate affects them and many are already making on-farm changes. 

"The agreement with sector leaders shows the value of collaboration and provides certainty for farmers, but the hard work begins now to develop the tools and systems to account for on-farm emissions in 2025. 

"The Government will back that with investment in research, extension services and advice for farmers," Damien O'Connor said.

More like this

The results are in - now what?

OPINION: Now voters have had their say, the incoming Government has some important decisions to make about farming in New Zealand.

Answers are in the soil

Wairarapa sheep farmer Rob Dick is on a mission to reduce his property’s environmental footprint as quickly as possible – and his approach starts with the soil.

State funding for riparian planting

More than 600km of Taranaki river and stream banks will be planted with a million native plants next winter as the region’s farmers take advantage of a $5 million government boost.

Precision tech helps farmer get it right

Mid-Canterbury arable and dairy farmer Craige Mackenzie’s philosophy is right input, right quantity, right place, right time — which makes sense for his business and for the land, waterways and climate.

Featured

 

John Deere names new Aust/NZ head

John Deere Australia/New Zealand’s new managing director Luke Chandler says he will prioritise leading the way in technology and investing in strong relationships.

Trade deal delivers new 'rulebook'

A new trade agreement, the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), has been described as a new rule book for trade in the Asian region.

National

Wyeth ready for the 'Coast'

The chief executive-elect of Yili-owned Westland Milk Products Richard Wyeth is looking forward to the challenge of running the company.

Machinery & Products

Weeds in for a shock

WIith an increasing focus on reducing chemical herbicides, largely because of crop resistance and a potential build-up of residues, new…

V8 - a baler with a grunt

Following three years of testing with clients worldwide, Ireland-based manufacturer McHale has added a bigger model to its range of…

Virtual CV valuable tool

With a 12-year history of recruiting specialised operators from overseas to service the agricultural contracting industry, Hanzon Jobs typically brings…

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Action, please!

The Hound notes that despite the new government having been elected for well over a month, there seems to a…

Educated?

Your canine crusader is intrigued to learn that the upper-class twats who attend Oxford University in the UK have voted…

» Connect with Rural News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter