Thursday, 29 November 2018 10:00

Standing firm on machinery

Written by 
Alistair Robinson, chair of the SIAFD executive committee. Alistair Robinson, chair of the SIAFD executive committee.

A firm stand on demonstrating machinery and technology is a key reason why 50% of the exhibitor sites are now sold for the South Island Agricultural Field Days, says spokesman Daniel Schat.

The biennial event routinely attracts about 30,000 visitors, he says.

“We are proud of our status as the field day with the largest machinery demonstration programme in New Zealand.”

The 2019 event will run from Wednesday March 27 to Friday March 29 at the field days’ permanent home near Kirwee, west of Christchurch. 

Alastair Robinson, the new chair of the SIAFD executive committee, says preparations for the 2019 field days are tracking well and the organising committee is improving infrastructure at the venue. 

“Sites are selling well, which is important for us because the income from registrations helps us to improve our facilities.”

 An upgrade of the electrical infrastructure at the Kirwee site will make it easier and safer for exhibitors to set up and clean up afterwards. Earlier this year the organisers gravelled all the laneways, and have extended the irrigation system and planted native trees along the boundaries, helped by volunteers.

Robinson acknowledges RX Plastics, Ashburton, for the 150mm pipe used to extend the irrigator; Cresslands Contracting and Porter Group for digging the pipe trench; Tony Redmond, Andrew Walker and Rodney Hadfield for helping lay the pipe, and Orari Nursery for the native plants. 

“A number of businesses have been very generous with their support, and others will step in with help as we get closer to the event,” Schat said.

www.siafd.co.nz

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