Monday, 31 October 2016 08:25

Gumboots optional

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Tractor fitted with Mitas Super Flexion Tyres. Tractor fitted with Mitas Super Flexion Tyres.

If you're experiencing a wet spring, don’t give up hope just yet; there might be a way to get onto land that’s in less-than-ideal condition.

Tyre manufacturer Mitas recently helped a Claas Axos tractor ‘walk on water’ in the often moisture laden Netherlands.

To ensure the attempt was a success and the 4 tonne tractor didn’t go straight to the bottom, engineers called on a sharp pencil, calculator and the principles of Archimedes.

The tractor was shod with Mitas 1250-50R32 Super Flexion Tyres at the rear and 750-55R30’s on the front, and the engineers calculated that the 2157L of air in each rear tyre and 685L in each front tyre, inflated to 2.4 bar, would be enough to walk the walk.

Not really designed to take the tractor for a weekend’s snapper fishing, but to reduce soil compaction in the paddock – especially in the case of harvesters, chaser bins and tractors – the 1250 rears are capable of carrying up to 14 tonnes, and each weighs 570kg.

www.mitas-tyres.com 

 

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