Thursday, 25 February 2021 10:55

Combines win robotics award

Written by  Mark Daniel
John Deere's X Series combine harvesters recently received a CES Innovation Award. John Deere's X Series combine harvesters recently received a CES Innovation Award.

John Deere's X Series Combine Harvesters received a CES Innovation Award to recognise their ‘outstanding product design and engineering in consumer technology’.

The X Series combine harvesters use ActiveVision camera technology that helps farmers see inside the grain tank. It also assists with observation of tailings to allow farmers to monitor the condition of harvested grain.

This technology, complemented by proprietary algorithms, is said to provide farmers with information to make critical decisions in the moment, while also gathering data to help them inform future decisions.

John Deere chief technology officer Jahmy Hindman says the award recognises the company’s efforts to build smart machines, systems and solutions.

“These help unlock customer economic value through enhanced precision, automation, speed and efficiency.”

While not yet available in Australia and New Zealand, two new X Series combine harvesters, the X9 1000 and X91100, will be added to John Deere’s harvesting line-up technology in late 2021.

JD claims the X Series uses the latest technology to deliver informed decisions and self-driving functions. For example, the harvester can automatically adjust itself to adapt to changing conditions to run at peak levels. This allows service technicians to manage things remotely, thereby minimising downtime and supporting profitability.

More like this

Italian stallions hit the spot

Having got throught the ravages of PSA, kiwifruit production has bounced back delivering record harvests and record prices for orchards.

Blowing life into apple harvest

Probably better known in the viticulture sector, Tractor Repairs and Spares (TRS) is now expanding into the horticulture area - with a focus on apple - after purchasing the FMR business in late 2020.

Opens up blindspots

Traditionally blind spots caused by large buckets or front mounted loads on wheeled loaders have been a major safety concern.

She's one big feeder

Feeder specialists Hustler has released a maxi-sized multi-feeder aimed at large scale farms in New Zealand and further afield.

New high-performance coulters

Amazone's new six-metre Cirrus 6003-2 and 6003-2D seed drills are now available with Twin-TeC+ double disc coulters that are said to enable precise and rapid sowing of large areas.

National

Deer farmer's roaring success

Southland elk farmer Tom May is no stranger to producing top quality velvet and believes that his Mayfield Elk Farm,…

The beginning - not end!

After seven years, the Red Meat Profit Partnership (RMPP) came to an end on 31 March, yet chair Malcolm Bailey…

Machinery & Products

SIAFD wins punters' plaudits

After celebrating its 70th year last month, it looks like the South Island Agricultural Field Days (SIAFD) has hit its…

Opens up blindspots

Traditionally blind spots caused by large buckets or front mounted loads on wheeled loaders have been a major safety concern.

She's one big feeder

Feeder specialists Hustler has released a maxi-sized multi-feeder aimed at large scale farms in New Zealand and further afield.

Roots out problems

Austrian manufacturer Pöttinger has introduced the new Durastar narrow share for its Synkro and Synkro-T, mounted stubble cultivators.

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Blue murder

OPINION: Your old mate recently read an off-the-wall suggestion, by some boffin, that deliberately staining meat blue will lead to…

Foot in mouth - again!

OPINION: This old mutt reckons Agriculture Minister Damien O'Connor too often suffers from 'foot in mouth' disease.

» Connect with Rural News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter