Monday, 07 December 2015 13:26

Targets hit 5 years early for Lake Brunner water quality

Written by 
Lake Brunner. Photo: Lake Brunner Tourism. Lake Brunner. Photo: Lake Brunner Tourism.

The water quality target of the West Coast's Lake Brunner has been achieved five years ahead of schedule, says Environment Minister Dr Nick Smith.

"The early achievement of the target is a fantastic result and goes to show what can be accomplished when government, local authorities, businesses and local communities collaborate to reach a shared objective," Dr Smith says.

The West Coast Regional Council and Westland Milk Products provided significant funding for initiatives focused on improving the lake's water quality, he says.

"A number of other organisations have also contributed to the project including AgResearch, NZ Landcare Trust, NIWA, and DairyNZ. However none of this would have happened without the hard work and effort of landowners and the local community," he says.

Results from water quality monitoring between 1992 and 2010 showed the lake was suffering from an observable decrease in water quality due to gradual enrichment and eutrophication.

Through the Government's Fresh Start for Fresh Water programme $200,000 was allocated to West Coast Regional Council to support planting and fencing work on both private farmland and community sites.

"By January 2016, when work is due to be completed, over 62 kilometres of fencing will have been erected, 21,000 riparian plants will have been planted on farms and over 5,000 by the Lake Brunner Community Catchment Care Group at the community sites."

Smith says the Government has an ambitious plan for stepping up New Zealand's freshwater management and Lake Brunner is an example of how we can reverse deteriorating water quality.

"The next steps will be a renewed fund to support community initiatives for improving water quality and a discussion paper in the New Year on how New Zealand can better manage freshwater within limits," he says.

Lake Brunner is an important ecological site, providing habitat to a number of threatened species while holding great cultural and recreational importance for the people of the West Coast and local tangata whenua.

» Connect with Rural News

More like this

Cultivating the right way

Cultivation of paddocks is common on farms at this time of year. It’s also a time when local storms may occur, adding substantial risk to an important farming practice.

Freshwater plan a killer blow

A national limit on dissolved nitrogen would “essentially eliminate” intensive agriculture in the Selwyn Waihora catchment, says Environment Canterbury chief scientist Dr Tim Davie.

» The RNG Weather Report

Featured

Soil moisture: no more looking over the fence

Farm manager Bryan Mitchell describes as brilliant the SCADAfarm systems that allow him to remotely monitor and manage the irrigation of his 300ha of leased grazing land near Kirwee.

 

Separation gives constant result

Effluent separation offers a number of unique advantages, and opportunities that other systems don’t offer, says farm equipment manufacturer Rakaia Engineering Ltd (REL) Group.

Cultivating the right way

Cultivation of paddocks is common on farms at this time of year. It’s also a time when local storms may occur, adding substantial risk to an important farming practice.

» Connect with Rural News

» Connect with Rural News

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Job hunting?

A mate of the Hound reckons outgoing special agricultural trade envoy Mike Petersen, who is due to finish his current…

Hot air?

With the Government wanting to implement huge costs on the livestock farming sector by making New Zealand the only country…

» Connect with Rural News