Tuesday, 16 October 2018 10:55

Business as usual following fire

Written by 
The rubber conveyor belt was responsible for bulk of the smoke. The rubber conveyor belt was responsible for bulk of the smoke.

Fertiliser co-op Ravensdown says it has good stocks of finished fertiliser products despite a massive fire at its Hornby site last week.

Customers have resumed collecting fertiliser from the 14ha site; the fire affected the eastern end.

Ravensdown chief executive Greg Campbell says product quality has not suffered, ‘although in the initial restart of service customers could expect some congestion on the site”.

The fire appears to have started during maintenance work and spread along the roof line when a rubber conveyor belt ignited. 

“The rubber belt helped spread the fire through the roofs of the four store buildings and caused the black smoke seen across the city,” says Campbell. 

“The buildings affected were of new fibreglass construction and did not contain asbestos. The cladding responded as it should, allowing emergency services to put the fire out quickly and safely from outside the building.”

The fire only affected building materials and conveyor structures. Ravensdown does not store explosive materials in any of their manufacturing plants. The two small bangs heard were likely exploding gas bottles used during the maintenance work. 

 

More like this

Fertiliser use in spring

The refreshed National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management increases the pressure on farmers to improve their nutrient management. 

Getting spring pasture covers right

Managing pasture surpluses or deficits in spring is the key to maintaining quality and persistence going into summer, says Ravensdown agronomist Tim Russell.

Small things make a big difference

Lamb daily growth rates on sheep farms in New Zealand are in a huge range — from as low as 80g to 350g or more per lamb per day. 

Getting to the top of this range requires attention to detail.

 
 

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

Milking It

If it clucks is it vegan?

Is food vegan simply because it doesn’t come from a cow? This question has puzzled one in five Britons.

Swinging out the lifeboats?

The Fonterra shareholders council announced last week that elections will take place in 10 of its 25 wards.

» Connect with Dairy News