Friday, 10 July 2015 11:10

‘Drought man’ coming to Lincoln

Written by 
Doug Avery. Doug Avery.

"Innovate or stagnate" will be the main message from Grassmere farmer Doug Avery when he visits Lincoln University next Thursday.

Avery's talk about turning drought and desperation into sustainability and success will take place on Thursday, July 16 at 7pm.

Avery, also known as the 'drought man', says he understands the value of farmers learning from farmers.

The talk aims to help farmers to prepare for change, for themselves, their business and their farm. The event is not just a "how to" session or "step by step" instructions on farming practice, but rather an inspiration for changing the way people think about farming in New Zealand, says Avery.

A number of agribusiness partners will attend, each of them critical to Avery's farming transformation. The focus will be on smart agriculture but also the best in thinking, people and technology and what it takes to bring about successful change management. Avery's knowledge comes from hard won experience and is invaluable in the face of increasing incidence of drought in New Zealand.

Avery's family won the 2010 South Island Farmer of the Year Competition for their work adapting farm management systems in response to increasingly dry conditions. His work in developing a system that works with the land instead of battling against it has attracted both national and international attention.

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