Monday, 26 March 2018 15:18

22,000 infected cattle to be culled

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MPI will begin a cull of 22,332 cattle on all properties infected with Mycoplasma bovis. MPI will begin a cull of 22,332 cattle on all properties infected with Mycoplasma bovis.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) will begin a cull of 22,332 cattle on all properties infected with Mycoplasma bovis after scientific testing and tracing confirmed the disease was not endemic.

The culling of all cattle infected with Mycoplasma bovis will give farmers much-needed certainty over their futures, says Agriculture and Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor.

O’Connor says this is a critical measure to control the spread of the disease.

“It has taken some time to get to this point.

“The previous National Government ignored the known deficiencies of the NAIT system and was slow to react to the initial discovery of Mycoplasma bovis.

“Everyone across New Zealand can understand how incredibly difficult it is for these farmers to lose their herds – many of these animals will be known individually. While we still have challenges ahead in managing this outbreak, these families can move forward with their farms and lives.”

MPI is boosting its compensation team to ensure prompt payment to affected farmers.

“Work continues to determine whether we can eradicate or move to long-term management of Mycoplasma bovis,” says O’Connor.

 

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