Tuesday, 10 November 2020 09:54

Waikato makes world’s first Tea Gouda

Written by  Sudesh Kissun
Miel Meyer and Zealong Tea Estate general manager Sen Kong at the cheese launch. Miel Meyer and Zealong Tea Estate general manager Sen Kong at the cheese launch.

Two Waikato producers have joined forces to create the world’s first tea-infused cow’s milk cheese.

The Tea Gouda cheese is a fusion of green and black tea grown in the Zealong Tea Estate near Gordonton and Gouda cheese made by Meyer Cheese, which runs its dairy farm and cheese factory just outside Hamilton.

The cheese is sold online via Meyer Cheese website.

Meyer Cheese general manager Miel Meyer told Dairy News that the collaboration was not a one-off idea but an evolution of thoughts after a few years of connecting, drinking tea and eating cheese and discussion around business and Waikato related topics. 

“We are thrilled that we have been able to produce a product which is a world first but also supports our business values and maintains the quality that our products are known for,” he says.

“We have been able to produce a well balanced cheese which supports the ‘hero’ flavours (green tea and black tea) the natural colour is also clearly visible for the consumer. 

“We are very excited to bring this out to our local trade show and gauge consumer response.”

Meyer says the Tea Gouda will be available for tasting at the Auckland Food Show later this month.

Miel says working with Zealong has been inspiring.

“Their story and their passionate team resonate what we at Meyer Cheese are all about.”

There are two versions of the Tea Gouda, both made with cows’ milk, one with Zealong Green tea and the other Zealong Black tea and aged on wood for four weeks with turning daily.

Zealong Tea says not many people would have expected the two companies to make for an elegant and delicious pairing. 

“But this is what defines these two companies, Zealong Estate and Meyer Cheese,” the company says.

“Both are local, both passionate about their product and both driven by collaboration and the energy of bucking the trend.”

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