Friday, 07 May 2021 08:55

New rules for on-farm procedures

Written by  Staff Reporters
Lambs under the age of six months can be docked by a competent person using either a hot iron or rubber ring and the length of the docked tail must be no shorter than the end of the caudal fold. Lambs under the age of six months can be docked by a competent person using either a hot iron or rubber ring and the length of the docked tail must be no shorter than the end of the caudal fold.

New animal welfare regulations come into effect on 9 May. These will affect many common procedures carried out on farms, such as tall docking and treatment of bearings.

Beef + Lamb New Zealand's senior advisor, biosecurity and animal welfare, Will Halliday, says the Significant Surgical Procedures regulations cover a range of procedures undertaken on animals - from specialist veterinary-only operations to routine on-farm procedures.

Bearings

Under the regulations, a bearing in a sheep may be treated by any competent person with the appropriate knowledge, experience, and equipment to do so. This includes treatment of a complete prolapse of the uterus.

Halliday says treatment of a bearing in a cow is a more difficult procedure, and this is reflected in the regulations.

"A competent person may replace a vaginal prolapse in a cattle beat provided the animal is under the influence of pain relief provided by a veterinarian."

He says failure to comply can mean a fine of up to $3,000 for an individual and $15,000 for a body corporate.

"Treatment of a prolapsed uterus in a cattle beast can only be undertaken by a veterinarian."

Tail-docking

The new regulations stipulate that lambs under the age of six months can be docked by a competent person using eithter a hot iron or rubber ring.

No other methods of tail docking are permitted. Failure to comply can mean a fine of up to $1,500.

"There is also a new requirement that the length of the docked tail must be no shorter than the end of the caudal fold - the fold of skin that runs from the underside of the tail to either side of the anus," Halliday explains.

He says the new regulations brings New Zealand's rules into line with those of our major trading partners, which require the docked tail to entirely cover the vulva in ewe lambs and an equivalent length in males.

"Failure to comply can mean an infringement fee of $500, with fines on coviction for repeat offences of up to $1,500 for an individual and $7,500 for a body corporate. Tail length will be assessed at the slaughter plant."

docking lambs tails which are older than six months is now a veterinary-only procedure.

More like this

Kiwis back animal welfare call

More than 3,000 Kiwis have signed a petition calling for imported pork to be required to meet the same animal welfare standards as New Zealand pork.

Why are animals mistreated?

There's been a spike in recent weeks of people appearing before the courts on charges of mistreating farm animals. 

National

Machinery & Products

New disc cultivator launched

Väderstad has introduced a new disc cultivator – the Carrier XT 425-625 – featuring rotating disc axles, that optimizes results…

JD unlocks its digital system

As a long-term advocate of digital technology, John Deere has taken the route of mass data capture, rather than concentrating…

» The RNG Weather Report

» Latest Print Issues Online

The Hound

Fruitful change?

OPINION: Your canine crusader notes that meat company Silver Fern Farms has undergone quite a refresh over the last few…

All for show?

OPINION: The Hound notes that Fonterra is cashing in on the curent government's largesse with taxpayer money.

» Connect with Rural News

» eNewsletter

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter